Me So Corny

Me So Corny

When I see it, I become distracted.  They come in various sizes and colors.  I’ve seen them long and thin and short and fat.  I’ll even admit that I just love to put my mouth on one.  So do you like fresh corn off the cob as much as I do?

One of the best places to live in July is near a cornfield.  You can find the freshest corn in your neighbor’s backyard (get permission first), a farmer selling it off his truck or at an “honor” stand.  City people need to know that an “honor stand” is a card table in front of someone’s house with produce and a coffee can on top.   (It still amazes me that no one just walks off with the cash.)

If you don’t have any of those places available, I know grocery stores carry fresh corn too but you need to know how to pick the correct cob.  I’m sure you’ve seen people pulling down the husk and taking a peek.  Do you wonder what they are looking for under that husk or do you think they are doing it because everyone else does it?  (Corn husking peer pressure can really dominate your life if you are not careful.)

First, look for a nice dark green, moist husk.  Next, the tips of the silk should be brown but the inner silk should be more golden brown.  Also, look at the stem, if it is really “brown” it is already a couple of days old.  Finally, look at the kernels.  They should be big and plump.  If you look at the tip and there are a lot of itty-bitty kernels, it was picked too soon and it won’t be as sweet.

You CAN eat corn that is a couple of days old.  Store it in the refrigerator in the husks and it will keep longer.  If you buy too much corn, which I tend to do, roast it in the oven and make some corn chowder with your leftovers!

Roasted Corn Chowder
Recipe type: Soup
 
Ingredients
  • 7 cups of fresh corn kernels (it is about 7 ears)
  • Grape seed oil
  • 4 green onions, rough chopped
  • 1 jalapeño, small dice
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 2 cups of half and half
  • A little more than ¼ cup cilantro, chopped (save a little for garnish)
  • Pinch salt and cayenne pepper
Instructions
  1. Coat corn kernels with grape seed oil.
  2. Roast corn in 400-degree oven for 15 minutes.
  3. When corn is finished cooking, set 2 cups aside.
  4. In a large saucepan or soup pot, add a little grape seed oil. Add green onion and jalapeño. Sauté over medium heat.
  5. Deglaze with the white wine.
  6. Put corn and sautéed veggies in your food processor or blender. Pulse until everything is evenly chopped. (If things aren’t chopping evenly, add a little of your chicken broth)
  7. In the same saucepan, add everything from the blender, reserved corn kernels, broth, cilantro, a pinch of salt and a pinch of cayenne pepper.
  8. Simmer on low for about 15 minutes. Remove pan from heat and add half & half.
  9. Put back on the heat for a minute or two to make sure the soup is warmed up.
  10. Garnish with a little cilantro.
  11. If you have an extra roasted red pepper around, toss it in the blender with a dash of cream and add a squiggle on top of your soup.
Notes
I've had some comments about the half & half. If you don't like your soup as creamy, add a little bit and taste it. It's your soup. I don't usually have half & half in the house so I use half whipped cream and half skim milk. It works and tastes delicious. So, do what you like. I won't tell.

You will love this soup-long time!  : )

2 Comments

  1. Don’t forget the crazy ones among us who like to eat raw corn. If it is fresh you will know how good it will be cooked! Also, I was told never to use a brush to get rid of the silk as it toughens the kernels. (This from a Missouri native.)

  2. Author

    Good hint on the brushing!

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